Tag Archives: superheavy

Improved evaluation of nuclear charge radii for superheavy nuclei

Although significant progress has been made in the synthesis of superheavy nuclei, the experimental knowledge of them is still very limited while the alpha decay chain is the main tool used to identify newly produced superheavy nuclei. Previously, we have extracted nuclear charge radii of superheavy nuclei via the experimental alpha decay data. As a further step, the density dependent cluster model is improved by introducing the difference between the density distributions of protons and neutrons. Besides, the important quantity, i.e., the alpha preformation factor, is connected with the microscopic correction of nuclear mass during this procedure, to perform a more reasonable description of the alpha decay process. It is found that the present deduced nuclear charge radii of heavy nuclei are in a better agreement with the measured values as compared to those in our previous evaluations. Subsequently, the nuclear radii of heavier even–even isotopes with Z = 98–116 are probed, accompanied by the consistency with the empirical evaluations. Moreover, the effect of the depressed density at the center of superheavy nucleus on the final extracted nuclear radius plus the decay lifetime is discussed, which appears to be different from the case of lighter nuclide.

 

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Formation of Superheavy Elements in Nature

It is shown that superheavy elements may also be formed in the main r process responsible for the formation of the heaviest elements observed in nature. Under conditions of a high neutron density, the nucleosynthesis region lies close to the neutron drip line, so that the r process may circumvent the region where nuclei undergo spontaneous fissions and therefore have short lifetimes. However, a high induced-fission rate, which increases with the charge number, may prevent the nucleosynthesis wave from overcoming the region of isotopes heavier than curium, and the beta-decay chain leading to an increase in the charge number of product elements inevitably results in the spontaneous fission of the majority of product nuclei. Calculations of nucleosynthesis that were performed with available nuclear data within the scenario of a neutron-star merger reveal that only Z < 106 superheavy elements are formed. Their abundance at the end of the r process is commensurate with the abundance of uranium, but their lifetime does not exceed several years, so that they fast undergo decay.

 

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